Calvin Benjamin  ‎(I989)‎
Given Names: Calvin
Surname: Benjamin

Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: 22 September 1815
Death: 13 September 1847 ‎(Age 31)‎ Mexico City, Federal District, Mexico State, MEX
Personal Facts and Details
Birth 22 September 1815
Military ServiceAttended West Point, Class of 1842
from 1 July 1838 to 1 July 1842 ‎(Age 22)‎
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United States Military Academy, West Point, Orange County, New York, USA
Latitude: N41.360043796210280 Longitude: W74.01823997497559 Mapquest © Google Maps © Multimap © TerraServer ©
Address:
United States Military Academy ‎(USMA)‎
626 Swift Road
West Point, New York 10996-1905
USA

Phone: ‎+1 (845) 938-4011‎
FAX: ‎+1 (845) 446-3021‎
Web URL: http://www.usma.edu/

Military ServiceGraduated West Point 10th in class; Promoted to Second Lieutenant, 4th Artillery
1 July 1842 ‎(Age 26)‎
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United States Military Academy, West Point, Orange County, New York, USA
Latitude: N41.360043796210280 Longitude: W74.01823997497559 Mapquest © Google Maps © Multimap © TerraServer ©
Address:
United States Military Academy ‎(USMA)‎
622 Swift Road
West Point, New York 10996-1985
USA

Phone: ‎+1 (845) 938-4011‎
FAX: ‎+1 (845) 688-4011‎
Web URL: http://www.usma.edu/

Military ServiceServed in garrison at Fort Monroe, Virginia
from 2 July 1842 to 9 May 1844 ‎(Age 26)‎
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Fort Monroe, Hampton, Independent City, Virginia, USA
Latitude: N37.003914423437570 Longitude: W76.30712985992432 Mapquest © Google Maps © Multimap © TerraServer ©
Address:
United States Military Academy ‎(USMA)‎
3 Ruckman Road, Building 77
Fort Monroe, Virginia 23651-6130
USA

Phone: ‎+1 (757) 788-3878‎
FAX: ‎+1 (757) 788-3713‎
Web URL: http://fort.monroe.army.mil/monroe/

Military ServiceServed on Coast Survey
from 10 May 1844 to 26 August 1845 ‎(Age 28)‎

Military ServiceServed in Military Occupation of Texas
from 27 August 1845 to 1846 ‎(Age 29)‎

Residence before 1846 ‎(Age 30)‎
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Indiana, USA
Latitude: N40.0003166 Longitude: W86.2502707 Mapquest © Google Maps © Multimap © TerraServer ©

Military ServiceBattle of Palo Alto
8 May 1846 ‎(Age 30)‎
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Palo Alto Battlefield, Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas, USA
Latitude: N26.024815195666697 Longitude: W97.46315002441406 Mapquest © Google Maps © Multimap © TerraServer ©

Military ServiceBattle of Resaca de la Palma
9 May 1846 ‎(Age 30)‎
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Resaca de la Palma Battlefield, Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas, USA
Latitude: N25.937915301957194 Longitude: W97.48651742935180 Mapquest © Google Maps © Multimap © TerraServer ©

Military ServicePromoted to Adjutant of the Artillery Battalion, 4th Artillery
from 29 June 1846 to 15 February 1847 ‎(Age 30)‎

Military ServiceBattle of Monterey
from 21 September 1846 to 23 September 1846 ‎(Age 30)‎

Military ServicePromoted to First Lieutenant, 4th Artillery
16 February 1847 ‎(Age 31)‎

Military ServiceSiege of Vera Cruz
from 9 March 1847 to 29 March 1847 ‎(Age 31)‎

Military ServiceBattle of Cerro Gordo
from 17 April 1847 to 18 April 1847 ‎(Age 31)‎

Military ServiceBattle of Contreras
from 19 August 1847 to 20 August 1847 ‎(Age 31)‎

Military ServiceBattle of Molino del Rey
from 8 September 1847 ‎(Age 31)‎

Death 13 September 1847 ‎(Age 31)‎
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Mexico City, Federal District, Mexico State, MEX
Latitude: N19.4270499 Longitude: W99.1275711 Mapquest © Google Maps © Multimap © TerraServer ©

Military ServiceStorming of Chapultepec
from 13 September 1847 ‎(on the date of death)‎

Military ServiceAssault of the City of Mexico
from 13 September 1847 ‎(on the date of death)‎

Military between 1846 and 1847 ‎(Age 30)‎ Second Division, Riley's Brigade, Fourth Artillery, First Lt., Co. G
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Mexico City, Federal District, Mexico State, MEX
Latitude: N19.4270499 Longitude: W99.1275711 Mapquest © Google Maps © Multimap © TerraServer ©

Burial
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Mexico City National Cemetery, Mexico City, Federal District, Mexico State, MEX
Latitude: N19.442645650127400 Longitude: W99.16574656963348 Mapquest © Google Maps © Multimap © TerraServer ©
Address:
Mexico City National Cemetery
31 Virginia Fábregas,
Colonia San Rafael,
Mexico


Reference NumberAhnentafel / Dollarhide
77.02

View Details for ...

Parents Family  (F129)
Isaac Benjamin
1771 - 1823
Arletta Cole
1792 - 1865
Edwin Benjamin
1814 - 1846
Calvin Benjamin
1815 - 1847
Judson Benjamin
1819 - 1855
Prudence Benjamin
1821 - 1867

Step-Parent Family  (F130)
Doctor David Tracy
1773 - 1853
Arletta Cole
1792 - 1865
Reverand Isaac Benjamin Tracy
1826 - 1901
Sophia Tracy
1828 -
Samuel Tracy
1830 - 1876
Saphronia Tracy
1833 - 1876


Notes

Note
MARRIAGE: Unmarried.

DEATH: Died in the Spanish-American War, in Mexico City, Mexico.

Note
United States Military Academy ‎(USMA)‎:
The United States Military Academy ‎(also known as USMA, West Point or "The Point" is an United States Army post and service academy. West Point was the first United States military post built after the Declaration of Independence. In its inception, it was under the command of Benedict Arnold. Established by Thomas Jefferson in 1802, it is the oldest military academy in the United States. Students are referred to as cadets. Collectively, graduates are known as "The Long Gray Line" because of the color of cadet uniforms and the unbroken line of West Point graduates. West Point trains more United States Army officers than any other single institution and a high proportion of distinguished American generals have been West Point graduates. Graduates are commissioned as U.S. Army second lieutenants.

The Academy is located at West Point, New York, on a scenic overlook of the Hudson River, about 50 miles north of New York City. Occupying over 16,000 acres, it is one of the largest school campuses in the world. By comparison, the United States Naval Academy is 338 acres and United States Air Force Academy is 18,000 acres. Its unique combination of facilities includes a ski slope and artillery range, in addition to the academic buildings and sports facilities found on a typical university campus. The post itself was first occupied in 1778; it is thus the oldest continuously occupied military post in the United States.

APPOINTMENT PROCESS
Prior to 1903, the student body was limited to a maximum of 600, although it was axiomatic that that maximum was rarely reached due to appointment rules and academic and disciplinary attrition in each class. Each US Representative was entitled to have one Cadet from his home district at any time, while each US Senator could have one Cadet from his home State at-large at any time. Each Territorial Delegate could have one Cadet, and the President could have thirty Cadets at any time. This left 89 slots that could be filled by other means, to include appointment from the enlisted ranks, and foreign military appointments. Each new class started with approximately 150 Cadets.

By an Act of Congress passed in 1903, two appointments as Cadets were allowed for each senator, representative, and delegate in Congress, two for the District of Columbia, and five each year at large on an Annual basis. Currently, each member of Congress and the Vice President can have five appointees attending the Military Academy at any time. When any appointee graduates or otherwise leaves the academy, a vacancy is created. The process is not political and applicants do not have to know their congressman to be nominated. Congressmen generally nominate ten people per vacancy. They can nominate people in a competitive manner, or they can have a principal nomination. In a competitive nomination, all ten applicants are reviewed by the academy to see who is the most qualified. If the congressman appoints a principal nominee, then as long as that candidate is physically, medically, and academically found qualified by the academy, he or she will be admitted, even if there are more qualified applicants. The degree of difficulty in obtaining a nomination varies greatly according to the number of applicants in a particular state. The process of obtaining a nomination typically consists of completing an application, completing one or more essays, and obtaining one or more letters of recommendation. These requirements are set by the respective senator or congressman and are in addition to the USMA application.

Additional sources of appointment are open to children of career military personnel (100 per year)‎; 170 appointments per year are for active-duty Army enlisted personnel; 20 appointments per year are provided for Army Reserve Officer Training Corps Cadets; and 65 appointments are available to children of military members who were killed in action, or were rendered 100% disabled from injuries received in action, or are currently prisoners of war or missing in action. Additionally, children of Medal of Honor recipients do not need a nomination, but only need to qualify for admission.

Typically, five to ten candidates are nominated for each appointment, which are normally awarded competitively; candidates who do not receive the appointment for which they are competing may still be admitted to the Academy as a qualified alternate. If a candidate is considered qualified but not picked up, they may receive an indirect admission to the United States Military Academy Preparatory School in Fort Monmouth, New Jersey; the following year, these candidates receive direct appointment to the Academy.

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
To be admitted, candidates must be between 17 and 23 years old upon entrance, cannot be married, have no legal obligation to support a child, and be of good moral character. The current process includes a university application, standardized testing, and personal references. Candidates for admission also must undergo a physical aptitude test as well as a complete physical exam ‎(the Department of Defense Medical Examination Review Board, or DoDMERB)‎, including a separate visual acuity test to be eligible for appointment, although medical waivers are available. Candidates with vision uncorrectable to 20/20, as well as a range of other injuries or illnesses, will be automatically considered for a medical waiver only if they are highly competitive. The Candidate Fitness Assessment ‎(CFA)‎ may be administered by any physical education teacher or Service Academy Liaison Officer. Any active duty commissioned officer may administer the CFA for service members.

In addition, about 20 candidates are admitted from foreign countries per year at the expense of the sending nation.

GRADUATION
Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree and most are commissioned as second lieutenants ‎(the lowest rank for a commissioned officer)‎ in the U.S. Army with an obligation to serve 5 years active service and 3 years inactive-reserve in the military. Eligibility for particular specialties ‎(infantry, artillery, armor, aviation, engineers, etc.)‎ is typically determined by academic performance and personal preference. A cadet is an honor graduate if he or she has earned a 3.5 or above Cadet Performance Score ‎(CPS)‎. Foreign cadets are commissioned into the armies of their home countries.

Since 1959, cadets have been able to "cross-commission," or request a commission in the Air Force, Navy, or Marine Corps, provided they meet that service's eligibility requirements. In previous years, a small number of graduates would do this, typically in a one-for-one "trade" with similarly inclined cadets or midshipmen at the other service academies. Today, however, with the demand for trained Army officers exceptionally high due to the War on Terror, cross-commissioning has been suspended.

Cross-commissioning is governed by USCC Policy Memorandum 03-04 ‎(SUBJECT: United States Corps of Cadets (USCC)‎ Policy on Interservice Commissioning of United States Military Academy ‎(USMA)‎ Cadets), dated 23 July 2004. This policy is in accordance with ‎(IAW)‎ USMA Policy #69-99 Interservice Commissioning of USMA Cadets.

Title 10, United States Code ‎(USC)‎, ‎(Sec 541)‎ and Department of Defense Directive ‎(DODD)‎ 1322.22 ‎(Paragraph 8)‎ provides for a limited number ‎(up to 12.5%)‎ of the graduates of each Federal Service Academy to request commissioning in any one of the Armed Services. The Secretary of each Service regulates this opportunity. Since 1991, the Army has limited the number of USMA cadets commissioned in another Service to not more than 1% of the graduating class, and normally on a one-for-one basis with the other Service Academies. Applicants must be approved by both the Secretary of the applicant’s own Academy and the Secretary of the gaining Service. Applicants will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and may be denied a transfer based on the needs and best interests of the proposed losing or gaining Service.

CURRICULUM
Cadets are educated and graded on their performance in academics, physical fitness, and military leadership.

The academic program consists of a core of 31 courses balanced in the arts and sciences. All cadets are required to take at least three engineering courses and three calculus courses. Cadets choose their majors in the fall of their second year. Up until their third year, all cadets take the same classes ‎(with the exception of those who are able to "validate" out of lower level classes and take advanced or accelerated courses)‎. Regardless of major ‎(there are currently 43)‎, all cadets graduate with a Bachelor of Science Degree because of the engineering requirements. The school ranks near the top of all undergraduate programs in the winning of prestigious scholarships and fellowships ‎(e.g., Rhodes Scholarship, Hertz fellowship, Truman Scholarship, Marshall Scholarship, and East-West)‎.

The physical program includes both physical education classes and competitive athletics. Every cadet participates in an intercollegiate, club or intramural ‎(called Company Athletics)‎ level sport each semester. As with all soldiers in the Army, cadets also must pass a physical fitness test twice per year. Additionally, during their third year, cadets must take the "Indoor Obstacle Course Test", or IOCT-which generally is regarded by cadets to be the "worst three minutes of the year."

Cadets learn basic military skills, including leadership, through a military program that begins on their first day at West Point. Most military training takes place during the summer, with new cadets undergoing Cadet Basic Training - or "Beast Barracks" - the first year, followed by Cadet Field Training at nearby Camp Buckner the second year. Cadets spend their third and fourth summers serving in active Army units around the world, attending advanced training courses such as airborne, air assault, or mountain warfare, or training the first- and second-year cadets as members of the leadership cadre. Additionally, cadets are housed in barracks and have leadership positions and responsibilities throughout the academic year.

Every summer, in the year between the Plebe ‎(freshman)‎ year and the Yearling ‎(sophomore)‎ year, the men and women train at Camp Buckner. In this six-week part of Cadet Summer Training at the Military Academy, the cadets are introduced to a variety of weapon systems and training exercises. The yearlings are under the command of the Cows ‎(juniors)‎. The Firsties ‎(seniors)‎, are in officer positions such as Platoon leader and Company commanders. There are eight companies of four platoons each; and they all must take part in both three-week training exercises. The first three weeks are focused more on training, while the last three weeks are more focused on practical exercises. Some field training exercises include first aid and med-evac, patrolling, search and attack, and land navigation. At the end of the six-week session, awards are given out to the best company based on the best performance at each training site. After the awards are given out, there is a "Camp Illumination" dance, and the yearlings are promoted to the rank of Cadet Corporal.

Moral-ethical development occurs throughout the formal programs as well as a host of activities and experiences available at the Academy. These include formal instruction in the important values of the military profession, voluntary religious programs, interaction with staff and faculty role models, and a vigorous guest-speaker program. The foundation of the ethical code at West Point is found in the Academy's motto, "Duty, Honor, Country." Cadets also also required to adhere to the Cadet Honor Code, which states simply, "A cadet will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do."

ACADEMIC QUALITY
In the 2008 "National Liberal Arts College" category in the US News & World Report rankings, West Point ranks #22 overall, and #2 of the public institutions on the list. The 2008 Forbes Magazine report on "America's Best Colleges," which puts more weight "on the quality of the education they provide, and how much their students achieve" ranks West Point as the #6 college in the country and #1 among the public institutions. According to the Office of the Dean, "West Point is 4th on the list of total winners for Rhodes Scholarships, 7th for Marshall and 4th on the list of Hertz Fellows."

RANK
Unlike virtually all other bachelor-degree granting institutions in the United States ‎(but like the other military academies)‎, the Academy does not refer to its students as freshmen, sophomores, juniors, or seniors; they are instead officially called "fourth class", "third class", "second class", and "first class".

Colloquially, freshmen are "plebes"; sophomores, "yearlings" or "Yuks"; juniors, "cows"; seniors, "firsties". Most cadets consider plebe year to be the most difficult because of the rules and restrictions developed to help students transition from civilian to cadet. However, the third class year is generally considered to be the hardest academically.

Within the classes, cadets can hold positions of increasing responsibility with a cadet rank:

* Fourth Class ‎(Plebe)‎: Cadet Private ‎(Member of Squad)‎.
* Third Class ‎(Yearling or Yuk)‎: Cadet Corporal ‎(Team Leader)‎.
* Second Class ‎(Cow)‎: Cadet Sergeant ‎(Squad Leader)‎; Platoon Sgt, various staff positions at the Company and Battalion level; Cadet First Sergeant ‎(First Sergeant)‎; Cadet Color Sergeant ‎(Color Guard member)‎, Cadet Sergeant Major ‎(Sergeant Major of a Battalion)‎.
* First Class ‎(Firstie)‎: Cadet Lieutenant ‎(Platoon Leader)‎, various staff positions within a Company; Cadet Captain ‎(Company Commander, Battalion Commander, Regimental Commander)‎, various staff positions at the Battalion level up to Brigade level; Cadet First Captain ‎(Brigade Commander)‎, highest position in the Corps of Cadets; Command Sergeant Major, at the Regimental and Brigade level.

ORGANIZATION
The Corps of Cadets has the following organization:

‎(The number of cadets is approximate and varies year to year)‎

* 1 Brigade ‎(4,000 cadets)‎ which consists of:
* 4 Regiments ‎(1,000 Cadets)‎ which consist of:
* 2 Battalions ‎(500 cadets)‎ which consist of:
* 4 Companies ‎(120 cadets)‎ which consist of:
* 4 Platoons ‎(30 cadets)‎ which consist of:
* 3 Squads ‎(7 cadets)‎ which consist of:
* 2–3 Teams ‎(2–3 cadets)‎

Note that various staff positions are not included above.

HISTORY
The site was selected for the construction of a fort by George Washington, and the fortifications were designed in 1778 by Tadeusz Kościuszko. In addition to various forts surrounding the area, a great chain was strung across the Hudson River in order to obstruct British ships attempting to navigate the river. Though never tested, the chain performed its purpose by preventing British movement up and down the river.

General Washington considered West Point one of the most important positions on the continent. The high ground above a narrow "S" curve in the Hudson River enabled the Continental Army to control the vital river traffic. He felt that the British Army could have split the colonies in two if they gained control of this land. It was as commander of the fortifications at West Point that Benedict Arnold committed his infamous treason when he attempted to sell the fort to the British.

George Washington quickly realized the need for a national military academy, but his Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson argued that there was no provision in the Constitution that allowed for the creation of a military academy. However, when Jefferson became president, he called for and signed legislation establishing the United States Military Academy on March 16, 1802; the school opened on July 4 of the same year.

The Superintendent from 1817 to 1833 was Colonel Sylvanus Thayer. He is known as the "father of the Military Academy." He upgraded academic standards, instilled military discipline and emphasized honorable conduct. He also created a teaching method known today as the Thayer Method, which emphasizes self study and daily homework, as well as small class size. This method is still used today. Inspired by the French École Polytechnique, Thayer made civil engineering the foundation of the curriculum. For the first half century, USMA graduates were largely responsible for the construction of the bulk of the nation's initial railway lines, bridges, harbors and roads. ‎(The tradition continues in the hands of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.)‎

In 1830, a fire occurred in the Academy building, housing ‎(on the first floor)‎; chemical laboratory, engineering room and chapel, and on the second floor the Adjuntant's office, Philosophy department, and Library. Many valuable historical records were lost from the Adjuntant's office.

In 1857, West Point's candidates for admission were nominated by the members of Congress, one for each congressional district. In addition, the President of the United States could nominate forty from the Republic at large. The requisites for admission were passing an examination, being a bachelor between 16 and 21, and having no physical defect. The cadet pay was about 5 pounds a month, of which board took 2 pounds, and 8s. 6d. was laid aside monthly, to assist in equipment expenses upon leaving. The balance covered dress and other expenses.

In 1857, cadets rose at 5 A.M. in summer, and 5-1/2 in winter. They doubled up bed and mattress, and studied till 7. The cadets then fell in and went to breakfast. At 7-1/2, 24 cadets were on guard-mounting duty every day. At 8, cadets studied. At 1 o'clock, the cadets broke up, fell in, and went to dinner. At the word of command, the cadets rose from dinner and were free till 2. From 2 P.M. to 4, the cadets studied. At 4, they drilled for one hour and a half, after which were free till sunset. At sunset, the cadets paraded in front of the barracks, and delinquents' names were called. The cadets had supper, after which they were free till 8. At 8, there was a call to quarters, and cadets retired to his own room to study till 9-1/2, when the tattoo is beat. At 10, there was a roll of the drum, and every light must be out and every cadet in bed."

WOMEN AT THE ACADEMY
West Point first accepted women as Cadets in 1976, when Congress authorized the admission of women to all of the federal service academies. Women comprise about 10 to 12 percent of entering plebes - or freshmen - and they pursue the same academic and professional training as do their male classmates, except with different physical aptitude standards on the Army Physical Fitness Test ‎(APFT)‎ and the Indoor Obstacle Course Test ‎(IOCT)‎. In addition women at West Point do not take boxing.

The first class with female cadets graduated in 1980. In 1989, Kristen Baker became the first female First Captain at West Point. An effigy of her is in the West Point Museum in a display room honoring her. To date ‎[May 2006]‎ three females have been appointed as the First Captain: Grace H. Chung in 2004 and Stephanie Hightower in 2006.

In 1995, Rebecca Marier became the academy's first female valedictorian.

Following the Air Force Academy sexual assault scandal and because of concerns about alleged sexual assault in the U.S. military, the Department of Defense was required to establish a task force to investigate sexual harassment and assault at the U.S. military academies in the law funding the military for the 2004 fiscal year. Though the definitions were broad, the report, issued August 25, 2005, showed that during 2004, 50 percent of women at West Point reported instances of sexual harassment while 111 incidents of sexual assault were reported.

The first female cadet to attain flag ‎(general officer)‎ rank was Rebecca Halstead, class of 1981. She was promoted to Brigadier General in 2005 and is currently serving as the Army's Chief of Ordnance.

CULLUM NUMBER
A Cullum number is the number beside a Cadet's name in the Register of Graduates.

The Cullum number is a reference and identification number assigned to each graduate of the United States Military Academy. It was created by brevet Major General George W. Cullum ‎(USMA Class of 1833)‎ who, in 1850, began the monumental work of chronicling the biographies of every graduate. He assigned Number 1 to the first West Point graduate, Joseph Gardner Swift, and then numbered all successive graduates in sequence. Before his death in 1892, General Cullum completed the first three volumes of a work that eventually comprised 10 volumes, entitled General Cullum’s Biographical Register of the Officers and Graduates of the United States Military Academy, and covering USMA classes from 1802 through 1850. The current Register of Graduates is a direct descendant of General Cullum's seminal work.

From 1802 through the Class of 1977, graduates were listed by General Order of Merit. Thus, the Register provided a quick reference for those looking for class rank. Beginning with the Class of 1978, graduates were listed alphabetically, and then by date of graduation.

Currently, seven graduates have an "A" suffix after their Cullum Number. For various reasons these graduates were omitted from the original class roster, and a suffix letter was added to avoid renumbering the entire class and subsequent classes.

WEST POINT MUSEUM
The visitor's center offers historical and informational videos, parking, restrooms, a gift shop, maps, pamphlets, a full-scale cadet barracks, and a movie theater; arrangements for guided tours also can be made. These tours, which are the only way the public can go on the grounds, are operated by a licensed contractor, West Point Tours, Inc., and leave the visitor's center several times a day. The tours stop and allow tourists to tour the Cadet Chapel ‎(if not in use at the time)‎, the parade grounds and Trophy Point. For the rest of the tour, the tourists remain on the bus as the guide narrates the tour of the rest of the campus.

The West Point Museum is directly adjacent to the visitor's center, in the renovated Olmsted Hall at Pershing Center on the grounds of the former Ladycliff College. The grounds were purchased by West Point after the college closed in the early 1980s. The building is named after the museum's primary donor, Major General George H. Olmsted, Class of 1922.

The West Point Museum is truly the National Museum of the United States Army, having been founded by funds provided by Congress prior to the Mexican War. The museum's collections represent all major categories of military study from arms, cannon and artillery to uniforms, military art and objects reflecting West Point's history. Originally opened to the public in 1854, the West Point Museum is the oldest and largest military museum in the country. It contains some of America's most interesting national military treasures and one of the finest collections of military artifacts available for public viewing. Every American armed conflict is represented in the 135 exhibits. An additional gallery portrays the history of the U.S. Army during peacetime and its role as a formative nation builder within the United States. West Point's history during and after the Revolutionary War, as well as the institutional history of the Military Academy, are traced in the West Point gallery devoted to the school, the cadet and the officer. The museum also provides exhibits in Thayer Hall, USMA to support the Department of History cadet curriculum with exhibit themes which range from ancient to modern civilizations.

The senior staff of the West Point Museum includes a director, three curators of collections, an exhibition designer, conservator, registrar and collections preparator. The Museum is self-guided and it is recommended to allow at least 1-2 hours to view the extended and magnificent exhibits. During the Summer months, the Museum operates historic Fort Putnam.

West Point often is the first place for automobile tourists to stop and view on the scenic Hudson River route between New York City and Albany.

Note
Ft. Monroe:
Fort Monroe ‎(also known as Fortress Monroe)‎ is a Hampton, Virginia, military installation located at Old Point Comfort, which is on the tip of the Virginia Peninsula. Along with Fort Calhoun, later renamed Fort Wool, it guarded approach by sea of the navigational shipping channel between the Chesapeake Bay and the entrance to the harbor of Hampton Roads, which itself is formed by the confluence of the Elizabeth River, the Nansemond River, and the James River, the longest in Virginia.

During the initial exploration by the mission headed by Captain Christopher Newport in the earliest days of the Colony of Virginia, the site was identified as a strategic defensive location. In May of 1607, they established the first permanent English settlement in the present-day United States about 25 miles further inland from the Bay along the James River at Jamestown. The land area where Fort Monroe is located became part of Elizabeth Cittie ‎[sic]‎ in 1619, Elizabeth River Shire in 1634, and was included in Elizabeth City County when it was formed in 1643. Over 300 years later, in 1952, Elizabeth City County and Fort Monroe's neighbor, the nearby Town of Phoebus, agreed to consolidate with the smaller independent city of Hampton, which became one of the large Seven Cities of Hampton Roads.

Beginning by 1609, fortifications had been established at Old Point Comfort during Virginia's first two centuries. However, the much more substantial facility of stone to become known as Fort Monroe ‎(and adjacent Fort Wool on a man-made island across the channel)‎ were completed in 1834. The principal facility was named in honor of U.S. President James Monroe. Throughout the American Civil War ‎(1861-1865)‎, although most of Virginia became part of the Confederate States of America, Fort Monroe remained in Union hands. It became notable as a historic and symbolic site of early freedom for former slaves under the provisions of contraband policies and later the Emancipation Proclamation. For several years thereafter, the former Confederate President, Jefferson Davis, was imprisoned in the area now known as the Casemate Museum on the base.

Completely surrounded by a moat, the six-sided stone fort is the only one of its kind left in the United States that is still an active Army post. Fort Monroe is one of several posts selected to be closed by September 2011. Many of its functions are being transfered to nearby Fort Eustis ‎(which itself was named for Fort Monroe's first commander, General Abraham Eustis, a noted artillery expert)‎. Several re-use plans for Fort Monroe after it is decommissioned are currently under development in the Hampton community.

EARLY 19TH CENTURY HISTORY
Following the War of 1812, the United States again came to realize the importance of protecting Hampton Roads and the inland waters from attack by sea, and construction was begun in 1819 on what would become the largest stone fort ever built in the United States. The fort, designed by Simon Bernard, features a moat completely surrounding the inner structures. As a young first lieutenant and engineer in the U.S. Army, Robert E. Lee was stationed there from 1831 to 1834, and played a major role in the final construction of both Fort Monroe and its opposite, Fort Calhoun. The latter, later renamed Fort Wool, was built on a man-made island called the Rip Raps across the navigational channel from Old Point Comfort in the middle of the mouth of Hampton Roads. The fort was briefly used to detain Black Hawk.

When construction was completed in 1834, Fort Monroe was referred to as the "Gibraltar of Chesapeake Bay." The fort accomplished this mission by mounting an impressive complement of the most powerful artillery of the time, 32-pounder guns with a range of over one mile. In conjunction with Fort Calhoun ‎(later Fort Wool)‎, this was just enough range to cover the main shipping channel into the area. ‎(Decommissioned after World War II, the former Fort Wool on Rip Raps is now adjacent to the southern man-made island of the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel, initially completed in 1957)‎.

TWENTIETH CENTURY HISTORY
Over time the armament at Fort Monroe was improved, taking advantage of new technologies. In addition, the fort controlled several sub installations around Hampton Roads, making the area one of the most heavily defended in the United States.

The Jamestown Exposition held in 1907 at Hampton Roads, featured an extensive naval review, including the Great White Fleet. Beginning in 1917, the former exposition site at Sewell's Point became a major base of the United States Navy. Currently, Norfolk Navy Base is the base supporting naval forces operating in the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, and Indian Ocean. It is the world's largest naval station based on supported military population.

Fort Monroe and Fort Wool stood guard during World War I and World War II, and successfully protected Hampton Roads and the important military and civilian resources located inland.

By World War II, Fort Monroe served as headquarters for an impressive array of coast artillery guns ranging from 3-inch rapid fire guns to 16-inch guns capable of firing a 2,000 pound projectile 25 miles. In addition, the Army controlled submarine barriers and underwater mine fields. But this vast array of armaments was all made obsolete after the second World War by the development of the long-range bomber and the aircraft carrier .

After the operational armament was removed, Fort Monroe received a mission that it still maintains to this day. Since World War II, it has served as the major headquarters for training soldiers for war. In 1973, Fort Monroe became home to the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command ‎(TRADOC)‎, which combines the recruitment, training and education of soldiers with the development of operational doctrine.

FORT MONROE TODAY
Fort Monroe supports a daytime population of about 2,096, including 1,105 people in uniform, 1,991 civilian and contract employees, and about 814 family members residing on post. The major tenant unit is the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command ‎(TRADOC)‎.

In addition to continuing to serve as an active military installation, Fort Monroe has become a popular historical site. The Casemate Museum, opened in 1951, depicts the history of Fort Monroe and Old Point Comfort, with special emphasis on the Civil War period. It offers a view of Confederate President Jefferson Davis' prison cell. Also shown are the quarters occupied by 1st Lt. Robert E. Lee in 1831-34, and the quarters where President Abraham Lincoln was a guest in May, 1862.

Fort Monroe is the scene of many running events, including for many years, the Shamrock Sportsfest Marathon.

Nearby, Fort Monroe's companion guardian of Hampton Roads, Fort Wool, located at Rip Raps is also available for tours.

Note: Fort Wool is located adjacent to one of the man-made islands of the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel and is accessible only by water. The availability of public tours of both Fort Wool and Fort Monroe are subject to Homeland Security Alert conditions.

BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE, 2005
The Department of Defense released a list on 13 May 2005, of military installations recommended for closure and/or realignment--among them is Fort Monroe. The list was approved by President George W. Bush on 15 September 2005, and submitted to Congress. Congress failed to act within forty-five legislative days to disapprove the list in its entirety, and the BRAC recommendations subsequently became law. Installations on the BRAC list must close within six years.

TRIVIA

* A man-made island across the navigational channel of the mouth of Hampton Roads from Old Point Comfort was created for Fort Calhoun ‎(a portion of the Fort Monroe complex later renamed Fort Wool)‎. This man-made island found a new purpose in 1957, when it was used to anchor the south portal of the 7,000 foot tunnel of the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel.
* The quarters occupied by Robert E. Lee while stationed at Fort Monroe are still in use as military family housing.

Note
Battle of Palo Alto:
The Battle of Palo Alto was the first major battle of the Mexican-American War and was fought on May 8, 1846, on disputed ground five miles from the modern-day city of Brownsville, Texas. A force of some 3,400 Mexican troops ‎(a portion of the Army of The North)‎ led by General Mariano Arista, with the Diaz de La Vega and Garcia Infantry Brigades ‎(2d Light, 1st, 6th and 10th Line Infantry regiments, Tampico Garda Costa Battalion and Company)‎ and the Torrejon Cavalry Brigade ‎(7th and 8th Line Cavalry, Mexico Light Cavalry Regiments, Presidial Companies and Rancheros Irregular Cavalry)‎ engaged a force of 2,400 United States troops - the so called US Army of Observation.

Right Wing: Col. Twiggs with 5th Infantry ‎(Lt. Col. McIntosh)‎, Ringgold's Light Artillery, 3d Infantry ‎(Capt. Morris)‎, Lt. Churchill's Artillery ‎(2-18 pounders)‎, 4th Infantry ‎(Major Allen)‎ and Captains Ker's and May's Dragoon Squadrons.
Left Wing: Lt. Col. Belknap with Lt. Col. Child's Artillery Battalion ‎(serving as Infantry)‎, and 8th Infantry ‎(Capt. Montgomery)‎

BACKGROUND
The battle occurred as a result of Mexican efforts to besiege a U.S. army installation, "Fort Texas," which the Mexicans viewed as having been built within the boundaries of Mexican Texas. General Zachary Taylor, receiving supplies from Port Isabel, heard the distant report of cannon fire. The Mexicans had begun to attack Fort Texas. Taylor gathered his troops and rushed to relieve the defenders of the fort but was intercepted by a Mexican force commanded by General Arista. Another Mexican force ‎(1,540 men, including 14 Artillery Guns, Matamoros Natl. Guards Battalion, Puebla and Morelia Activoes Battalions)‎ under General Francisco Mejia were left behind at Fort Brown and Matamoros.
Garrison: Major Brown with 7th Infantry, Capt. Loud's Artillery Co. with 4-18 pounders, and Lt. Bragg's Light Artillery guns.

BATTLE
General Arista's army was stretched a mile wide, making an American bayonet charge impossible. Taylor, in an unlikely move, advanced his artillery to attack the enemy. It was this "Flying Artillery" - the tactic of using light artillery to attack then quickly move to another location and fire once more, developed by Major Samuel Ringgold - that won the battle for the Americans. The Mexican artillery, heavy and slow, was futile in the thick brush at Palo Alto. Arista ordered cavalry charges to flank the artillery gunners, but the American "Flying Artillery" was able to mobilize, relocate, and repel the oncoming dragoons.

AFTERMATH
Ringgold died of wounds inflicted in the battle, but his death spurred a significant boost to morale across America. After the first day, Taylor arose to find that the Mexicans had withdrawn from the field of battle and moved camp to the site of the next engagement, Resaca de La Palma. Mexicans suffered large casualties compared to the Americans for several reasons. The Mexican army had poor gunpowder compared to the Americans, shortening the range of their cannon and musket fire. The poor powder had a tendency to explode prematurely and caused many soldiers to pour smaller amounts of gunpowder, further affecting the range of their weapons. Mexican soldiers usually had little training and were often scared of the volatile gunpowder. The Mexicans, as was typical throughout the war, had technologically inferior weaponry to the Americans. The musket Arista's men used was the British Brown Bess - the same weapon the British had used during the Napoleonic Wars and American Revolutionary War a century before.

The venue is now Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site and is maintained by the National Park Service. ‎(­http­://­www­.­nps­.­gov­/­paal­/­index­.­htm­ )‎

Note
Mexico City National Cemetery:
Throughout the War with Mexico it was the practice of the U.S. Army, following major military engagements, to bury the dead in mass graves on or near the battlefield where they fell. Generally, this task was performed as quickly as possible for one very practical reason: the warm climate in which most of the war was fought hastened decomposition.

The bodies of soldiers who died later of their wounds, or from some other cause, were also buried promptly, usually near whichever building was serving as an army hospital at the time. In towns garrisoned by American troops for long periods, burials often took place beside an existing campo santo ‎(cemetery)‎. Rarely were U.S. soldiers interred within the boundaries of a Mexican graveyard. The reason? Nearly all Mexicans were Roman Catholics, whereas most American soldiers were Protestants. Mixing members of the two faiths together in the same cemetery was frowned upon by both.

Only a few bodies were shipped back to the U.S. for permanent burial. Since the U.S. government did not assume this responsibility during the Mexican War, most of these were officers whose families could afford the expense. If the deceased was particularly well-known, other prominent citizens of the community from which he came might contribute to the cost of transporting his body. In such cases, it was also not uncommon for a small group of these same persons to travel to Mexico, to arrange for the disinterment and to accompany the deceased on the journey back to the states. On at least one occasion, one of these delegates became ill while in Mexico and himself died during the trip back home.

Apart from the few whose remains were brought home, the graves of most Americans who died in Mexico during the war were left unmarked and untended. To this very day, the bones of many an American soldier lie buried in some lonely, forgotten spot, in places known only to the men who have long since joined their comrades in death.

There is one notable exception to this otherwise sad commentary on the way our government has generally failed to bestow upon Mexican War soldiers the same honor and dignity granted to soldiers of later wars. On September 28, 1850 Congress passed an act approving "the purchase of a cemetery near the city of Mexico, and the interment therein of the remains of the American officers and soldiers who fell in battle or otherwise died in or near the city of Mexico." Consequently, on June 21, 1851 two acres of land was purchased from one Manuel Lopez for the sum of $3,000. Although the cemetery was primarily established to give these fallen heroes a quiet and serene enshrinement befitting their deeds and sacrifices, space was set aside for US citizens who would in the future succumb here in Mexico City. This particular terrain was selected because it was adjacent to the British Cemetery, established in 1824, where a few of our men were temporarily interred.

The Mexico City National Cemetery was founded on 26 June 1851, four years after the United States-Mexican War, and was operated and maintained by the U.S. State Department. On July 21, 1852 Congress approved the appropriation of an additional $1,734.34 for "purchasing, walling, and ditching" the American cemetery in Mexico City.

By 1853, the bodies of some 750 U.S. soldiers were recovered from their shallow battlefield graves in and around Mexico City and were buried in the Mexico City National Cemetery in one common plot since their original wooden markers were no longer legible. They were mostly the casualities of the battles that occurred in and near Mexico City in August and September 1847. They were not identified so they are classified as "Unknown Soldiers." Although a marker at the site suggests these men are unknown soldiers, that is not the case. The names of all these men were recorded in casualty lists compiled at the time of the war.

There are a total of 1,563 persons interred here. Besides the 750 U.S. soldiers, there were 813 civilians buried here before the cemetery was closed to further burials in 1924. As is the rule in our government cemeteries, all grave plots and markers were of uniform size. This is a most striking example of our democratic philosophy of equality. It is also for this reason that the cemetery kept little data on the worldly importance of those who are interred here. Most are veterans and their families, who saw service in the Mexican War, Civil War ‎(both Union and five Confederates)‎, Indian campaigns and the Spanish-American War. Others were members of the U.S. Diplomatic Service, or their families. The first non-Mexican War burial was of a man named Reuben Willhite, who died on November 20, 1851. The last interment, it appears, was of a U.S. Army hospital steward, Charles Knowlton Sams, who died December 14, 1923.

On 18 May 1872, Congress appropriated $500 to reimburse the American consul for the cost of maintaining the "American Protestant Cemetery" for the past year and approved a salary of $1,105 for the cemetery keeper. A year later on 3 March 1873, by an Act of Congress, the cemetery was declared a U.S. National Cemetery, to be operated and maintained by the U.S. War Department. Finally, on 17 July 1947, President Harry S. Truman, by Executive Order No. 9873, transferred responsibility from the U.S. War Department to the American Battle Monuments Commission ‎(­http­://­www­.­abmc­.­gov­/­wardead­/­listings­/­mexican_war­.­php­ )‎. Today, in addition to the Mexico City National Cemetery, the Commission maintains twenty-three other U.S. cemeteries around the world.

The remains of all the people buried in the Mexico City National Cemetery lay undisturbed and relatively forgotten until 1976 when a highway called the Circuito Interior was constructed on the west side of the cemetery. At that time, the cemetery was reduced in size to a single acre. The civilian remains were exhumed and re-interred in crypts constructed at the east and west walls of the grounds by the Mexican government. Simultaneously, the remains of the 750 Mexican War soldiers were re-interred in two new vaults placed in the center of the south end of the grounds.

A small monument made of white stone stands at the far end of the cemetery, above the vaults holding the remains of the men who died there during the War with Mexico. There is a brief inscription in gold letters on the monument's base. Presumably out of respect to the sensitivities of the Mexican people ‎(or perhaps to prevent vandalism)‎, it does not identify the men who are buried there as soldiers nor does it make it any reference to the war. It reads simply:

"TO THE HONORED MEMORY OF 750 AMERICANS KNOWN BUT TO GOD WHOSE BONES COLLECTED BY THEIR COUNTRY'S ORDER ARE HERE BURIED."

More than 800 other people, mostly Americans, are interred in crypts in the wall on the sides of the cemetery. In 1923, the Mexico City National Cemetery was closed to further burials.

Today, the cemetery is a tiny oasis of calm and quiet in the heart of Mexico City. It is located behind high walls at Virginia Fábregas 31, Colonia San Rafael - almost at the intersection of San Cosmé and Melchor Ocampo. The Plaza de la Constitucíon, or Zocalo, is about 2-1/2 miles to the east and the U.S. Embassy is about 1 mile south. Memorial Day services, usually attended by the U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, are held annually. It is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., except Christmas Day and New Year's Day. When the cemetery is open, a staff member is on duty to answer questions and escort visitors to grave sites.
Death The names are alphabetically arranged, with the year of graduation and the number in Cullum's Biographical Register. The sign † signifies that the graduate. died before July 1, 1902.

View Notes for ...


Media

Multimedia Object
Battle of Monterey, by N. Orr of "N. Orr & Richardson, S.C., N.Y."Battle of Monterey, by N. Orr of "N. Orr & Richardson, S.C., N.Y."  ‎(MMISC-ORR-002)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Note: Image Source:
Montgomery, Henry. The Life of Major General Zachary Taylor. New York: J. C. Derby, 1847.


Multimedia Object
Battle of Buena Vista, by N. Orr of "N. Orr & Richardson, S.C., N.Y."Battle of Buena Vista, by N. Orr of "N. Orr & Richardson, S.C., N.Y."  ‎(MMISC-ORR-001)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Note: Image Source:
Montgomery, Henry. The Life of Major General Zachary Taylor. New York: J. C. Derby, 1847.


Multimedia Object
General Taylor at the Battle of Resaca de la Palma, by N. Orr of "N. Orr & Richardson, S.C., N.Y."General Taylor at the Battle of Resaca de la Palma, by N. Orr of "N. Orr & Richardson, S.C., N.Y."  ‎(MMISC-ORR-005)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Note: Image Source:
Montgomery, Henry. The Life of Major General Zachary Taylor. New York: J. C. Derby, 1847.


Multimedia Object
Narrow Escape of Zachary Taylor, by N. Orr of "N. Orr & Richardson, S.C., N.Y."Narrow Escape of Zachary Taylor, by N. Orr of "N. Orr & Richardson, S.C., N.Y."  ‎(MMISC-ORR-003)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Note: Image Source:
Montgomery, Henry. The Life of Major General Zachary Taylor. New York: J. C. Derby, 1847.


Multimedia Object
General Taylor at the Battle of Palo Alto, May 8th, 1846, by N. Orr of "N. Orr & Richardson, S.C., N.Y."General Taylor at the Battle of Palo Alto, May 8th, 1846, by N. Orr of "N. Orr & Richardson, S.C., N.Y."  ‎(MMISC-ORR-004)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Note: Image Source:
Montgomery, Henry. The Life of Major General Zachary Taylor. New York: J. C. Derby, 1847.


Multimedia Object
General Scott Enters Mexico City, by Carl Nebel.General Scott Enters Mexico City, by Carl Nebel.  ‎(MMISC-NEBEL-007)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Copyright 2004 The Mexican-American War, Northern Illinois University Libraries.
Permission to reproduce granted to David Ernest Williams by Drew E. VandeCreek, Director of Digital Projects, Northern Illinois University Libraries, Multimedia Digitization Lab, DeKalb, IL 60115, ‎(815)‎ 753-7179, drew@niu.edu.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: The Mexican-American War note(s) by Northern Illinois University Libraries:
Nebel, Carl and George Wilkins Kendall. "The War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated." New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1851.
This print is part of a book written by George Wilkins Kendall, founder and editor of the New Orleans <i>Picayune</i>. Published in 1851, it was titled <i>The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated.</i> This particular print was owned by George W. Kendall himself and are part of the special collections at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. ‎(­http­:/­library­.­uta­.­edu­/ )‎

During the war, Kendall followed the U.S. Army as a correspondent for the <i>Picayune.</i> When he decided to write a book about the conflict, he commissioned Carl Nebel, a German artist whom Kendall met in Mexico City to create the pictures that would be used to make prints to illustrate the book.

Kendall's book was quite large. Only 500 copies were printed. The picture area of Nebel's prints measured approximately 11 inches by 17 inches with a border measuring about 4 inches.

The pictures are relatively accurate. However, Nebel never traveled to Northern Mexico and Kendall himself was present only at Monterey during the Northern Campaign. As a consequence, for the battles of Palo Alto, Monterey, and Buena Vista, the artist had to rely on pictures sketched by others. The most glaring error is the mountains that Nebel included in the background of the Battle of Palo Alto. Anyone who has visited the battlefield can attest that the terrain in that region is flat coastal prairie with not a mountain in sight. The most probable explanation is Nebel mistook the trees or clouds in the background of another artist's picture for mountains.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:
Owning Institution: Northern Illinois University Libraries ‎(­http­:/­www­.­ulib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
Collection Name: Illinois Historical Digitization Projects ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
The Mexican-American War: ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/­mexicanwar­/­index­.­html­ )‎


Multimedia Object
Assault on Chapultepec Castle, 12/13 September 1847Assault on Chapultepec Castle, 12/13 September 1847  ‎(MMAP-CHAPULTEPEC1847)‎
Type: Map


Multimedia Object
Storming of Chapultepec -- Putman's Attack, by Carl Nebel.Storming of Chapultepec -- Putman's Attack, by Carl Nebel.  ‎(MMISC-NEBEL-004)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Copyright 2004 The Mexican-American War, Northern Illinois University Libraries.
Permission to reproduce granted to David Ernest Williams by Drew E. VandeCreek, Director of Digital Projects, Northern Illinois University Libraries, Multimedia Digitization Lab, DeKalb, IL 60115, ‎(815)‎ 753-7179, drew@niu.edu.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: The Mexican-American War note(s) by Northern Illinois University Libraries:
Nebel, Carl and George Wilkins Kendall. "The War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated." New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1851.
This print is part of a book written by George Wilkins Kendall, founder and editor of the New Orleans <i>Picayune</i>. Published in 1851, it was titled <i>The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated.</i> This particular print was owned by George W. Kendall himself and are part of the special collections at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. ‎(­http­:/­library­.­uta­.­edu­/ )‎

During the war, Kendall followed the U.S. Army as a correspondent for the <i>Picayune.</i> When he decided to write a book about the conflict, he commissioned Carl Nebel, a German artist whom Kendall met in Mexico City to create the pictures that would be used to make prints to illustrate the book.

Kendall's book was quite large. Only 500 copies were printed. The picture area of Nebel's prints measured approximately 11 inches by 17 inches with a border measuring about 4 inches.

The pictures are relatively accurate. However, Nebel never traveled to Northern Mexico and Kendall himself was present only at Monterey during the Northern Campaign. As a consequence, for the battles of Palo Alto, Monterey, and Buena Vista, the artist had to rely on pictures sketched by others. The most glaring error is the mountains that Nebel included in the background of the Battle of Palo Alto. Anyone who has visited the battlefield can attest that the terrain in that region is flat coastal prairie with not a mountain in sight. The most probable explanation is Nebel mistook the trees or clouds in the background of another artist's picture for mountains.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:
Owning Institution: Northern Illinois University Libraries ‎(­http­:/­www­.­ulib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
Collection Name: Illinois Historical Digitization Projects ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
The Mexican-American War: ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/­mexicanwar­/­index­.­html­ )‎


Multimedia Object
Storming of Chapultepec -- Pillow's Attack, by Carl Nebel.Storming of Chapultepec -- Pillow's Attack, by Carl Nebel.  ‎(MMISC-NEBEL-003)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Copyright 2004 The Mexican-American War, Northern Illinois University Libraries.
Permission to reproduce granted to David Ernest Williams by Drew E. VandeCreek, Director of Digital Projects, Northern Illinois University Libraries, Multimedia Digitization Lab, DeKalb, IL 60115, ‎(815)‎ 753-7179, drew@niu.edu.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: The Mexican-American War note(s) by Northern Illinois University Libraries:
Nebel, Carl and George Wilkins Kendall. "The War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated." New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1851.
This print is part of a book written by George Wilkins Kendall, founder and editor of the New Orleans <i>Picayune</i>. Published in 1851, it was titled <i>The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated.</i> This particular print was owned by George W. Kendall himself and are part of the special collections at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. ‎(­http­:/­library­.­uta­.­edu­/ )‎

During the war, Kendall followed the U.S. Army as a correspondent for the <i>Picayune.</i> When he decided to write a book about the conflict, he commissioned Carl Nebel, a German artist whom Kendall met in Mexico City to create the pictures that would be used to make prints to illustrate the book.

Kendall's book was quite large. Only 500 copies were printed. The picture area of Nebel's prints measured approximately 11 inches by 17 inches with a border measuring about 4 inches.

The pictures are relatively accurate. However, Nebel never traveled to Northern Mexico and Kendall himself was present only at Monterey during the Northern Campaign. As a consequence, for the battles of Palo Alto, Monterey, and Buena Vista, the artist had to rely on pictures sketched by others. The most glaring error is the mountains that Nebel included in the background of the Battle of Palo Alto. Anyone who has visited the battlefield can attest that the terrain in that region is flat coastal prairie with not a mountain in sight. The most probable explanation is Nebel mistook the trees or clouds in the background of another artist's picture for mountains.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:
Owning Institution: Northern Illinois University Libraries ‎(­http­:/­www­.­ulib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
Collection Name: Illinois Historical Digitization Projects ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
The Mexican-American War: ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/­mexicanwar­/­index­.­html­ )‎


Multimedia Object
Molino del Rey -- Attack upon the Molino, by Carl Nebel.Molino del Rey -- Attack upon the Molino, by Carl Nebel.  ‎(MMISC-NEBEL-009)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Copyright 2004 The Mexican-American War, Northern Illinois University Libraries.
Permission to reproduce granted to David Ernest Williams by Drew E. VandeCreek, Director of Digital Projects, Northern Illinois University Libraries, Multimedia Digitization Lab, DeKalb, IL 60115, ‎(815)‎ 753-7179, drew@niu.edu.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: The Mexican-American War note(s) by Northern Illinois University Libraries:
Nebel, Carl and George Wilkins Kendall. "The War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated." New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1851.
This print is part of a book written by George Wilkins Kendall, founder and editor of the New Orleans <i>Picayune</i>. Published in 1851, it was titled <i>The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated.</i> This particular print was owned by George W. Kendall himself and are part of the special collections at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. ‎(­http­:/­library­.­uta­.­edu­/ )‎

During the war, Kendall followed the U.S. Army as a correspondent for the <i>Picayune.</i> When he decided to write a book about the conflict, he commissioned Carl Nebel, a German artist whom Kendall met in Mexico City to create the pictures that would be used to make prints to illustrate the book.

Kendall's book was quite large. Only 500 copies were printed. The picture area of Nebel's prints measured approximately 11 inches by 17 inches with a border measuring about 4 inches.

The pictures are relatively accurate. However, Nebel never traveled to Northern Mexico and Kendall himself was present only at Monterey during the Northern Campaign. As a consequence, for the battles of Palo Alto, Monterey, and Buena Vista, the artist had to rely on pictures sketched by others. The most glaring error is the mountains that Nebel included in the background of the Battle of Palo Alto. Anyone who has visited the battlefield can attest that the terrain in that region is flat coastal prairie with not a mountain in sight. The most probable explanation is Nebel mistook the trees or clouds in the background of another artist's picture for mountains.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:
Owning Institution: Northern Illinois University Libraries ‎(­http­:/­www­.­ulib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
Collection Name: Illinois Historical Digitization Projects ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
The Mexican-American War: ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/­mexicanwar­/­index­.­html­ )‎


Multimedia Object
Molino del Rey -- Attack upon the Casa Mata, by Carl Nebel.Molino del Rey -- Attack upon the Casa Mata, by Carl Nebel.  ‎(MMISC-NEBEL-008)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Copyright 2004 The Mexican-American War, Northern Illinois University Libraries.
Permission to reproduce granted to David Ernest Williams by Drew E. VandeCreek, Director of Digital Projects, Northern Illinois University Libraries, Multimedia Digitization Lab, DeKalb, IL 60115, ‎(815)‎ 753-7179, drew@niu.edu.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: The Mexican-American War note(s) by Northern Illinois University Libraries:
Nebel, Carl and George Wilkins Kendall. "The War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated." New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1851.
This print is part of a book written by George Wilkins Kendall, founder and editor of the New Orleans <i>Picayune</i>. Published in 1851, it was titled <i>The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated.</i> This particular print was owned by George W. Kendall himself and are part of the special collections at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. ‎(­http­:/­library­.­uta­.­edu­/ )‎

During the war, Kendall followed the U.S. Army as a correspondent for the <i>Picayune.</i> When he decided to write a book about the conflict, he commissioned Carl Nebel, a German artist whom Kendall met in Mexico City to create the pictures that would be used to make prints to illustrate the book.

Kendall's book was quite large. Only 500 copies were printed. The picture area of Nebel's prints measured approximately 11 inches by 17 inches with a border measuring about 4 inches.

The pictures are relatively accurate. However, Nebel never traveled to Northern Mexico and Kendall himself was present only at Monterey during the Northern Campaign. As a consequence, for the battles of Palo Alto, Monterey, and Buena Vista, the artist had to rely on pictures sketched by others. The most glaring error is the mountains that Nebel included in the background of the Battle of Palo Alto. Anyone who has visited the battlefield can attest that the terrain in that region is flat coastal prairie with not a mountain in sight. The most probable explanation is Nebel mistook the trees or clouds in the background of another artist's picture for mountains.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:
Owning Institution: Northern Illinois University Libraries ‎(­http­:/­www­.­ulib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
Collection Name: Illinois Historical Digitization Projects ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
The Mexican-American War: ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/­mexicanwar­/­index­.­html­ )‎


Multimedia Object
Assault at Contreras, by Carl Nebel.Assault at Contreras, by Carl Nebel.  ‎(MMISC-NEBEL-006)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Copyright 2004 The Mexican-American War, Northern Illinois University Libraries.
Permission to reproduce granted to David Ernest Williams by Drew E. VandeCreek, Director of Digital Projects, Northern Illinois University Libraries, Multimedia Digitization Lab, DeKalb, IL 60115, ‎(815)‎ 753-7179, drew@niu.edu.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: The Mexican-American War note(s) by Northern Illinois University Libraries:
Nebel, Carl and George Wilkins Kendall. "The War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated." New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1851.
This print is part of a book written by George Wilkins Kendall, founder and editor of the New Orleans <i>Picayune</i>. Published in 1851, it was titled <i>The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated.</i> This particular print was owned by George W. Kendall himself and are part of the special collections at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. ‎(­http­:/­library­.­uta­.­edu­/ )‎

During the war, Kendall followed the U.S. Army as a correspondent for the <i>Picayune.</i> When he decided to write a book about the conflict, he commissioned Carl Nebel, a German artist whom Kendall met in Mexico City to create the pictures that would be used to make prints to illustrate the book.

Kendall's book was quite large. Only 500 copies were printed. The picture area of Nebel's prints measured approximately 11 inches by 17 inches with a border measuring about 4 inches.

The pictures are relatively accurate. However, Nebel never traveled to Northern Mexico and Kendall himself was present only at Monterey during the Northern Campaign. As a consequence, for the battles of Palo Alto, Monterey, and Buena Vista, the artist had to rely on pictures sketched by others. The most glaring error is the mountains that Nebel included in the background of the Battle of Palo Alto. Anyone who has visited the battlefield can attest that the terrain in that region is flat coastal prairie with not a mountain in sight. The most probable explanation is Nebel mistook the trees or clouds in the background of another artist's picture for mountains.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:
Owning Institution: Northern Illinois University Libraries ‎(­http­:/­www­.­ulib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
Collection Name: Illinois Historical Digitization Projects ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
The Mexican-American War: ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/­mexicanwar­/­index­.­html­ )‎


Multimedia Object
Battle of Cerro Gordo, by Carl Nebel.Battle of Cerro Gordo, by Carl Nebel.  ‎(MMISC-NEBEL-002)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Copyright 2004 The Mexican-American War, Northern Illinois University Libraries.
Permission to reproduce granted to David Ernest Williams by Drew E. VandeCreek, Director of Digital Projects, Northern Illinois University Libraries, Multimedia Digitization Lab, DeKalb, IL 60115, ‎(815)‎ 753-7179, drew@niu.edu.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: The Mexican-American War note(s) by Northern Illinois University Libraries:
Nebel, Carl and George Wilkins Kendall. "The War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated." New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1851.
This print is part of a book written by George Wilkins Kendall, founder and editor of the New Orleans <i>Picayune</i>. Published in 1851, it was titled <i>The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated.</i> This particular print was owned by George W. Kendall himself and are part of the special collections at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. ‎(­http­:/­library­.­uta­.­edu­/ )‎

During the war, Kendall followed the U.S. Army as a correspondent for the <i>Picayune.</i> When he decided to write a book about the conflict, he commissioned Carl Nebel, a German artist whom Kendall met in Mexico City to create the pictures that would be used to make prints to illustrate the book.

Kendall's book was quite large. Only 500 copies were printed. The picture area of Nebel's prints measured approximately 11 inches by 17 inches with a border measuring about 4 inches.

The pictures are relatively accurate. However, Nebel never traveled to Northern Mexico and Kendall himself was present only at Monterey during the Northern Campaign. As a consequence, for the battles of Palo Alto, Monterey, and Buena Vista, the artist had to rely on pictures sketched by others. The most glaring error is the mountains that Nebel included in the background of the Battle of Palo Alto. Anyone who has visited the battlefield can attest that the terrain in that region is flat coastal prairie with not a mountain in sight. The most probable explanation is Nebel mistook the trees or clouds in the background of another artist's picture for mountains.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:
Owning Institution: Northern Illinois University Libraries ‎(­http­:/­www­.­ulib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
Collection Name: Illinois Historical Digitization Projects ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
The Mexican-American War: ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/­mexicanwar­/­index­.­html­ )‎


Multimedia Object
Bombardment of Vera Cruz, by Carl Nebel.Bombardment of Vera Cruz, by Carl Nebel.  ‎(MMISC-NEBEL-012)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Copyright 2004 The Mexican-American War, Northern Illinois University Libraries.
Permission to reproduce granted to David Ernest Williams by Drew E. VandeCreek, Director of Digital Projects, Northern Illinois University Libraries, Multimedia Digitization Lab, DeKalb, IL 60115, ‎(815)‎ 753-7179, drew@niu.edu.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: The Mexican-American War note(s) by Northern Illinois University Libraries:
Nebel, Carl and George Wilkins Kendall. "The War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated." New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1851.
This print is part of a book written by George Wilkins Kendall, founder and editor of the New Orleans <i>Picayune</i>. Published in 1851, it was titled <i>The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated.</i> This particular print was owned by George W. Kendall himself and are part of the special collections at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. ‎(­http­:/­library­.­uta­.­edu­/ )‎

During the war, Kendall followed the U.S. Army as a correspondent for the <i>Picayune.</i> When he decided to write a book about the conflict, he commissioned Carl Nebel, a German artist whom Kendall met in Mexico City to create the pictures that would be used to make prints to illustrate the book.

Kendall's book was quite large. Only 500 copies were printed. The picture area of Nebel's prints measured approximately 11 inches by 17 inches with a border measuring about 4 inches.

The pictures are relatively accurate. However, Nebel never traveled to Northern Mexico and Kendall himself was present only at Monterey during the Northern Campaign. As a consequence, for the battles of Palo Alto, Monterey, and Buena Vista, the artist had to rely on pictures sketched by others. The most glaring error is the mountains that Nebel included in the background of the Battle of Palo Alto. Anyone who has visited the battlefield can attest that the terrain in that region is flat coastal prairie with not a mountain in sight. The most probable explanation is Nebel mistook the trees or clouds in the background of another artist's picture for mountains.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:
Owning Institution: Northern Illinois University Libraries ‎(­http­:/­www­.­ulib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
Collection Name: Illinois Historical Digitization Projects ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
The Mexican-American War: ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/­mexicanwar­/­index­.­html­ )‎


Multimedia Object
Capture of Monterey, by Carl Nebel.Capture of Monterey, by Carl Nebel.  ‎(MMISC-NEBEL-010)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Copyright 2004 The Mexican-American War, Northern Illinois University Libraries.
Permission to reproduce granted to David Ernest Williams by Drew E. VandeCreek, Director of Digital Projects, Northern Illinois University Libraries, Multimedia Digitization Lab, DeKalb, IL 60115, ‎(815)‎ 753-7179, drew@niu.edu.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: The Mexican-American War note(s) by Northern Illinois University Libraries:
Nebel, Carl and George Wilkins Kendall. "The War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated." New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1851.
This print is part of a book written by George Wilkins Kendall, founder and editor of the New Orleans <i>Picayune</i>. Published in 1851, it was titled <i>The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated.</i> This particular print was owned by George W. Kendall himself and are part of the special collections at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. ‎(­http­:/­library­.­uta­.­edu­/ )‎

During the war, Kendall followed the U.S. Army as a correspondent for the <i>Picayune.</i> When he decided to write a book about the conflict, he commissioned Carl Nebel, a German artist whom Kendall met in Mexico City to create the pictures that would be used to make prints to illustrate the book.

Kendall's book was quite large. Only 500 copies were printed. The picture area of Nebel's prints measured approximately 11 inches by 17 inches with a border measuring about 4 inches.

The pictures are relatively accurate. However, Nebel never traveled to Northern Mexico and Kendall himself was present only at Monterey during the Northern Campaign. As a consequence, for the battles of Palo Alto, Monterey, and Buena Vista, the artist had to rely on pictures sketched by others. The most glaring error is the mountains that Nebel included in the background of the Battle of Palo Alto. Anyone who has visited the battlefield can attest that the terrain in that region is flat coastal prairie with not a mountain in sight. The most probable explanation is Nebel mistook the trees or clouds in the background of another artist's picture for mountains.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:
Owning Institution: Northern Illinois University Libraries ‎(­http­:/­www­.­ulib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
Collection Name: Illinois Historical Digitization Projects ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
The Mexican-American War: ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/­mexicanwar­/­index­.­html­ )‎


Multimedia Object
Battle of Palo Alto, by Carl Nebel.Battle of Palo Alto, by Carl Nebel.  ‎(MMISC-NEBEL-011)‎
Type: Other


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Copyright 2004 The Mexican-American War, Northern Illinois University Libraries.
Permission to reproduce granted to David Ernest Williams by Drew E. VandeCreek, Director of Digital Projects, Northern Illinois University Libraries, Multimedia Digitization Lab, DeKalb, IL 60115, ‎(815)‎ 753-7179, drew@niu.edu.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: The Mexican-American War note(s) by Northern Illinois University Libraries:
Nebel, Carl and George Wilkins Kendall. "The War Between the United States and Mexico Illustrated." New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1851.
This print is part of a book written by George Wilkins Kendall, founder and editor of the New Orleans <i>Picayune</i>. Published in 1851, it was titled <i>The War Between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated.</i> This particular print was owned by George W. Kendall himself and are part of the special collections at the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. ‎(­http­:/­library­.­uta­.­edu­/ )‎

During the war, Kendall followed the U.S. Army as a correspondent for the <i>Picayune.</i> When he decided to write a book about the conflict, he commissioned Carl Nebel, a German artist whom Kendall met in Mexico City to create the pictures that would be used to make prints to illustrate the book.

Kendall's book was quite large. Only 500 copies were printed. The picture area of Nebel's prints measured approximately 11 inches by 17 inches with a border measuring about 4 inches.

The pictures are relatively accurate. However, Nebel never traveled to Northern Mexico and Kendall himself was present only at Monterey during the Northern Campaign. As a consequence, for the battles of Palo Alto, Monterey, and Buena Vista, the artist had to rely on pictures sketched by others. The most glaring error is the mountains that Nebel included in the background of the Battle of Palo Alto. Anyone who has visited the battlefield can attest that the terrain in that region is flat coastal prairie with not a mountain in sight. The most probable explanation is Nebel mistook the trees or clouds in the background of another artist's picture for mountains.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:
Owning Institution: Northern Illinois University Libraries ‎(­http­:/­www­.­ulib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
Collection Name: Illinois Historical Digitization Projects ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/ )‎
The Mexican-American War: ‎(­http­:/­dig­.­lib­.­niu­.­edu­/­mexicanwar­/­index­.­html­ )‎


Multimedia Object
Mexican-American War Taylor's Campaign, August to September 1847Mexican-American War Taylor's Campaign, August to September 1847  ‎(MMAP-MEXICAN-WAR-16)‎
Type: Map


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Public Domain
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: Mexican-American War Maps note(s) by The Department of History at the United States Military Academy:
In 1938 the predecessors of what is today The Department of History at the United States Military Academy began developing a series of campaign atlases to aid in teaching cadets a course entitled, "History of the Military Art." Since then, the Department has produced over six atlases and more than one thousand maps, encompassing not only America’s wars but global conflicts as well.

In keeping abreast with today's technology, the Department of History is providing these maps on the internet as part of the department's outreach program. The maps were created by the United States Military Academy’s Department of History and are the digital versions from the atlases printed by the United States Defense Printing Agency.

We gratefully acknowledge the accomplishments of the department's former cartographer, Mr. Edward J. Krasnoborski, along with the works of our present cartographer, Mr. Frank Martini.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:

Multimedia Object
Mexican-American War Scott's Campaign, March to September 1847Mexican-American War Scott's Campaign, March to September 1847  ‎(MMAP-MEXICAN-WAR-15)‎
Type: Map


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Public Domain
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: Mexican-American War Maps note(s) by The Department of History at the United States Military Academy:
In 1938 the predecessors of what is today The Department of History at the United States Military Academy began developing a series of campaign atlases to aid in teaching cadets a course entitled, "History of the Military Art." Since then, the Department has produced over six atlases and more than one thousand maps, encompassing not only America’s wars but global conflicts as well.

In keeping abreast with today's technology, the Department of History is providing these maps on the internet as part of the department's outreach program. The maps were created by the United States Military Academy’s Department of History and are the digital versions from the atlases printed by the United States Defense Printing Agency.

We gratefully acknowledge the accomplishments of the department's former cartographer, Mr. Edward J. Krasnoborski, along with the works of our present cartographer, Mr. Frank Martini.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:

Multimedia Object
Mexican-American War Taylor's Campaign, 1846-1847Mexican-American War Taylor's Campaign, 1846-1847  ‎(MMAP-MEXICAN-WAR-14)‎
Type: Map


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Public Domain
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: Mexican-American War Maps note(s) by The Department of History at the United States Military Academy:
In 1938 the predecessors of what is today The Department of History at the United States Military Academy began developing a series of campaign atlases to aid in teaching cadets a course entitled, "History of the Military Art." Since then, the Department has produced over six atlases and more than one thousand maps, encompassing not only America’s wars but global conflicts as well.

In keeping abreast with today's technology, the Department of History is providing these maps on the internet as part of the department's outreach program. The maps were created by the United States Military Academy’s Department of History and are the digital versions from the atlases printed by the United States Defense Printing Agency.

We gratefully acknowledge the accomplishments of the department's former cartographer, Mr. Edward J. Krasnoborski, along with the works of our present cartographer, Mr. Frank Martini.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:

Multimedia Object
Mexican-American War Summary of Operations, 1846-1847Mexican-American War Summary of Operations, 1846-1847  ‎(MMAP-MEXICAN-WAR-13)‎
Type: Map


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Public Domain
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: Mexican-American War Maps note(s) by The Department of History at the United States Military Academy:
In 1938 the predecessors of what is today The Department of History at the United States Military Academy began developing a series of campaign atlases to aid in teaching cadets a course entitled, "History of the Military Art." Since then, the Department has produced over six atlases and more than one thousand maps, encompassing not only America’s wars but global conflicts as well.

In keeping abreast with today's technology, the Department of History is providing these maps on the internet as part of the department's outreach program. The maps were created by the United States Military Academy’s Department of History and are the digital versions from the atlases printed by the United States Defense Printing Agency.

We gratefully acknowledge the accomplishments of the department's former cartographer, Mr. Edward J. Krasnoborski, along with the works of our present cartographer, Mr. Frank Martini.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:

Multimedia Object
Mexican War Overview MapMexican War Overview Map  ‎(MMAP-MEXICAN-WAR-OVR)‎
Type: Map


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Public Domain
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: Mexican-American War Maps note(s) by The Department of History at the United States Military Academy:
In 1938 the predecessors of what is today The Department of History at the United States Military Academy began developing a series of campaign atlases to aid in teaching cadets a course entitled, "History of the Military Art." Since then, the Department has produced over six atlases and more than one thousand maps, encompassing not only America’s wars but global conflicts as well.

In keeping abreast with today's technology, the Department of History is providing these maps on the internet as part of the department's outreach program. The maps were created by the United States Military Academy’s Department of History and are the digital versions from the atlases printed by the United States Defense Printing Agency.

We gratefully acknowledge the accomplishments of the department's former cartographer, Mr. Edward J. Krasnoborski, along with the works of our present cartographer, Mr. Frank Martini.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:

Multimedia Object
Description of Map SymbolsDescription of Map Symbols  ‎(MMAP-MEXICAN-WAR-SYM)‎
Type: Map


Show Details Shared Note: - COPYRIGHT: Public Domain
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States Federal Government under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code.

Show Details Shared Note: - DESCRIPTION: Mexican-American War Maps note(s) by The Department of History at the United States Military Academy:
In 1938 the predecessors of what is today The Department of History at the United States Military Academy began developing a series of campaign atlases to aid in teaching cadets a course entitled, "History of the Military Art." Since then, the Department has produced over six atlases and more than one thousand maps, encompassing not only America’s wars but global conflicts as well.

In keeping abreast with today's technology, the Department of History is providing these maps on the internet as part of the department's outreach program. The maps were created by the United States Military Academy’s Department of History and are the digital versions from the atlases printed by the United States Defense Printing Agency.

We gratefully acknowledge the accomplishments of the department's former cartographer, Mr. Edward J. Krasnoborski, along with the works of our present cartographer, Mr. Frank Martini.

Show Details Note: REPOSITORY: Original image location note‎(s)‎ by David Ernest Williams:
View Media for ...


Family with Parents
Father
Isaac Benjamin ‎(I987)‎
Birth 27 May 1771
Death 16 September 1823 ‎(Age 52)‎ Shelby County, Indiana, USA
21 years
Mother
 
Arletta Cole ‎(I986)‎
Birth 12 July 1792 Shaftsbury, Bennington County, Vermont, USA
Death 13 March 1865 ‎(Age 72)‎ Shelby County, Indiana, USA

Marriage: 29 August 1813
13 months
#1
Brother
Edwin Benjamin ‎(I988)‎
Birth 15 September 1814
Death 3 January 1846 ‎(Age 31)‎
1 year
#2
Calvin Benjamin ‎(I989)‎
Birth 22 September 1815
Death 13 September 1847 ‎(Age 31)‎ Mexico City, Federal District, Mexico State, MEX
3 years
#3
Brother
Judson Benjamin ‎(I990)‎
Birth 12 February 1819
Death 20 February 1855 ‎(Age 36)‎
3 years
#4
Sister
Prudence Benjamin ‎(I992)‎
Birth 16 August 1821
Death 20 October 1867 ‎(Age 46)‎
Mother's Family with Doctor David Tracy
Step-Father
Doctor David Tracy ‎(I985)‎
Birth 13 October 1773 Connecticut, USA
Death 23 August 1853 ‎(Age 79)‎
19 years
Mother
 
Arletta Cole ‎(I986)‎
Birth 12 July 1792 Shaftsbury, Bennington County, Vermont, USA
Death 13 March 1865 ‎(Age 72)‎ Shelby County, Indiana, USA

Marriage: 17 March 1825 -- Shelby County, Indiana, USA
1 year
#1
Half-Brother
Reverand Isaac Benjamin Tracy ‎(I929)‎
Birth 8 March 1826 Hanover, Shelby County, Indiana, USA
Death 20 September 1901 ‎(Age 75)‎ Metamora, Franklin County, Indiana, USA
2 years
#2
Half-Sister
Sophia Tracy ‎(I930)‎
Birth 1 February 1828 Indiana, USA
Death Yes
2 years
#3
Half-Brother
Samuel Tracy ‎(I932)‎
Birth 9 July 1830
Death 25 January 1876 ‎(Age 45)‎
3 years
#4
Half-Sister
Saphronia Tracy ‎(I933)‎
Birth 28 February 1833
Death 19 October 1876 ‎(Age 43)‎